posted by Jennifer • October 3rd, 2013 • Comments Off on Elle Interview

In the world according to Olivia Wilde, social responsibility is as necessary to being human as breathing—or shopping. While the face of Revlon may be best known for seducing married men in The Change Up and Butter (and sometimes women on The O.C.) she is also an avid humanitarian. Her latest pet project is Conscious Commerce, an organization she launched with her best friend Barbara Burchfield (the woman behind Global Citizen Festival), with the goal of changing how people shop. The premise is simple: pair retail items with a vetted, charitable cause, and turn shopping into a fundraising tool.

For its latest collaboration, Conscious Commerce paired up with Anthropologie and designer Yoana Baraschi to create a garment that gives back (and is available online now). The sweet, tulle-embroidered “New Light” dress (often worn by Wilde herself) will benefit the New Light school in Kolkata, India. The organization serves as an orphanage and health clinic that allows children in the low income, red light districts of the city to escape sex trafficking and violence. One hundred percent of the profits from the first 1,000 dresses sold will go directly to funding the school.

We talked to Wilde to learn about the future of Conscious Commerce and why world aid might just be the coolest youth movement.

How did Conscious Commerce come about?
The idea was born out of a desire to find alternative ways of fundraising. Barbara [Burchfield] and I had been working in Haiti since 2008, desperately trying to raise money for education and healthcare projects. We kind of grew together as philanthropists. She’s a really tremendous mover-and-shaker. And we were just tired of fundraisers in the typical form. We thought there had to be another way to use the money that people are already spending—billions of dollars a day—and to funnel some of that to these worthy, small, locally run organizations.

Why did you choose to collaborate with Anthropologie?
Anthropologie is a company we really wanted to work with because we respect their ethics and their world view. It was the perfect way for us to broaden our horizons. But the core of the mission remains the same: That we were going to help a very specific organization that was run locally and educate consumers here about who they [are] helping. This is going to be a wonderful opportunity for consumers from Anthropologie to learn about New Light. And each tag on the dress has information about [the organization].

What’s the main problem children in Kolkata face?
Prostitution is a big, big problem. It’s passed on through generations. So, women who are born into it, tend to stay in it, and so do their children. There are girls who have already been working on the streets and they’re 8 years old. It’s really horrifying. So, Urmi Basu [the founder] built this school and orphanage for these girls, allowing them to go to school, to live in a safe community, and to have an opportunity to find work outside of prostitution, [while staying] connected to their families.

What is next for Conscious Commerce?
It will launch this fall as a website that’s really a guide to living consciously in all different ways and buying products for a purpose. You can come to our site and see which [products] are actually benefiting the organization they’re claiming to. We’re two girls who are very interested in fashion and style, as well as philanthropy. We wanted to give people a chance to see which pair of sunglasses are actually worth investing in. And eventually we want to grow from just style to guiding people to build consciously: architecture, food, health. We are just beginning.

What drives you to do this?
Seeing our secondary school go from being a patch of dirt in a field with cows to a thriving school with over 1,000 students, who would otherwise not be provided a secondary education, is extraordinary. I just can’t believe [it] came from just an idea.

How did your interest in this conscientious way of living develop?
I’ve been interested in aid work, activism, and philanthropy since I was really young. I grew up in Washington, D.C. with two journalist parents who were both very active and wanted to make the world a better place. We were raised with the ethos that that’s your responsibility as a human.

What is your dream project?
I’d love to work with Stella McCartney and have a Conscious Commerce collaboration that benefits animals.

Tell us about your involvement with ‘Half the Sky’?
I read the book [by Nicholas Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn], and I found it totally amazing, just incredibly life-changing. I loved how optimistic it was as a call to action. These women are overcoming unimaginable odds to build organizations, start companies, to survive, when you just can’t imagine how you would survive. I leaped at the chance to become a part of the documentary and traveled all over the world: to Cambodia, to Sierra Leone, to Kenya, and India.

What did you learn from working with them?
Optimism is the key. There’s a movement happening through our generation that I’m really proud to be a part of. Toms, Warby Parker, and Invisible Children, are all run by young people with a sense of excitement and optimism. Philanthropy is no longer a world for the old or rich. It belongs to the young people again because we’re finding the most innovative ways of alleviating poverty. Global Citizen Festival is a great example of that.

What other philanthropic models inspire you?
Ryot.org. They’re former aid workers that started a news site that provides an opportunity for the reader to become immediately active after reading a news story. You read about something happening in Syria, and at the bottom of the article, there’s an opportunity to volunteer, sign a petition, and donate money. I just love that really optimistic, active way of involving people in the news. We would like to do the same thing for consumers.

elle.com

filed in Interviews
posted by Jennifer • September 30th, 2013 • Comments Off on Olivia Wilde plays 1970s supermodel in “Rush”

Olivia Wilde is back on the big screen after starring in the comedy “Drinking Buddies.” This time, she’s part of the Ron Howard film “Rush,” playing a 1970s supermodel.

“I love the ’70s, and I’ve always loved the ’70s – the music, the fashion. I’m inspired by it. I think I would’ve done well then,” said Wilde.

In “Rush,” Wilde plays supermodel Suzy Miller, who would one day marry actor Richard Burton. But before Burton, she had a relationship with Formula One star James Hunt, and that relationship is part of “Rush.”

“I did a lot of background research. I did as much as I could about Suzy and James,” said Wilde. “And it was fun because they were a really interesting couple. They were exciting. They were sort of like Johnny Depp and Kate Moss. They fill bathtubs full of champagne and go crazy in it?”

“There was something so wild about them, and yet they got married which was this incredibly insane, kind of optimistic thing to do. It was short-lived but powerful,” said Wilde.

Death is definitely a possibility in the racing world, and in this movie, you see the danger spinning all over the track.

“I didn’t know anything about racing before,” said Wilde. “That’s the thing, Americans don’t know a lot about Formula One. We don’t have to. We understand when we see it on film.”

“Rush” is based on a true story of the intense rivalry between two famous Formula One drivers: James Hunt and Niki Lauda.

“I liken it to, as far as sports rivalries go, Magic [Johnson] and [Larry] Bird – two people whose rivalry drove them to greatness, and that made a lot of sense to me,” said Wilde. “Watching it, I think, allows you to understand that’s kind of a universal experience for people who are at the top of their game.”

“Rush” is rated R and is in limited release this weekend.

abclocal.go.com

filed in Interviews, Videos
posted by Jennifer • September 28th, 2013 • Comments Off on 2013 Global Citizen Festival Photos

The photo gallery at Olivia Wilde Source has been updated with 33 HQ and MQ images of Olivia Wilde attending the 2013 Global Citizen Festival in New York on September 28th.

Olivia Wilde Source Olivia Wilde Source Olivia Wilde Source Olivia Wilde Source

• Olivia Wilde Source > Public Events > In 2013 > 2013 Global Citizen Festival
• Olivia Wilde Source > Public Events > In 2013 > 2013 Global Citizen Festival – Backstage
• Olivia Wilde Source > Public Events > In 2013 > 2013 Global Citizen Festival – Show

filed in Events, Gallery
posted by Jennifer • September 19th, 2013 • Comments Off on Olivia Wilde on ’70s Fashion in “Rush”

“Extra’s” Ben Lyons caught up with Olivia Wilde at the Toronto Film Festival to talk about her upcoming 1970s racing flick “Rush,” in which her character wore cool ‘70s fashion.

Watch our interview, plus find out what kind of wedding she’s planning with fiancé Jason Sudeikis!

extratv.com

filed in Interviews, Videos
posted by Jennifer • September 17th, 2013 • Comments Off on “Allure” Behind-the-Scenes Video

You can now watch a behind the scenes video of Olivia Wilde during her photo shoot for “Allure” magazine!

filed in Magazines, Videos
posted by Jennifer • September 17th, 2013 • Comments Off on Olivia Wilde Joins Avon as the New Face of Today. Tomorrow. Always. Fragrances

Beginning this fall in the U.S., actress, activist and renowned beauty Olivia Wilde will serve as the face of Avon’s beloved “Today. Tomorrow. Always.” trio of fragrances. A modern icon of beauty, Wilde’s enduring appeal perfectly complements this timeless fragrance series. First launched in 2004, Today. Tomorrow. Always. has become a set of Avon classics that evokes strong feelings of true love. As the brand approaches a decade, Wilde’s timeless allure makes her the ideal face of this classic, yet modern collection.

“I am honored to be partnering with Avon as the face of the Today. Tomorrow. Always. fragrances,” explained Wilde. “The collection is made up of fragrances that are true classics, yet modern and fresh at the same time.”

“Olivia is an aspirational example of a woman who embodies beauty both inside and out,” says Meg Lerner, Avon Vice President, North America Marketing. “Her passion and dedication to helping others makes her a perfect fit for Avon.”

THE SCENTS:

TODAY: A precious, joyful white floral, Today captures the lush, sweet scent of the nectar-rich, honey-scented blossoms of the Butterfly Bush.

TOMORROW: This oriental woody scent envelops you in the rich, warm scent of exotic flowers and golden fruits.

FOREVER: Fresh, romantic and enduring, Forever immerses you in an embrace of petally Florals, creamy woods and sensual musk.

PRICE: $30.00

WHERE TO BUY: Available exclusively through Avon Representatives. To locate an Avon Representative call 1-800-FOR-AVON or visit www.avon.com.

filed in News
posted by Jennifer • September 16th, 2013 • Comments Off on Behind the scenes with Rush actress Olivia Wilde

Rush tells the high-speed story of real-life race car drivers James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and Niki Lauda (Daniel Brühl), detailing their competitive relationship in the high-stakes world of Formula One racing during the 1970s. Olivia Wilde plays Suzy Miller, a Playboy model who posed for the centerfold in September 1972.

Suzy married James Hunt, a notorious womanizer, and the film explores their volatile relationship. Wilde says, “Suzy and James are an example of the kind of reckless, romantic, optimistic behavior of the time and they had a tumultuous marriage. But she was very much in love with him, and I think he with her, but she ended up leaving him for Richard Burton.” Actor Richard Burton is famous for marrying Elizabeth Taylor not once, but twice. They were also divorced twice.

After meeting at a party in Spain, Suzy Miller and James Hunt got married in 1974, but were divorced by 1976. Suzy received a $1 million divorce settlement.

About falling in love with a dare-devil, Wilde adds, “James is not the safe bet your mother wants you to marry, but he was endearing and, I think, irresistible.” Who doesn’t love a bad boy?

Rush opens in theaters September 27th.

sheknows.com

filed in Films, Videos
posted by Jennifer • September 13th, 2013 • Comments Off on HeyUGuys Interview

Really proving to be a safe bet in Hollywood, Olivia Wilde is turning up in a host of films, all so different to the last – showing off her ability to adapt to several different projects and genres. In her latest flick, Ron Howard’s Rush – she plays Suzy Miller – the formidable wife of playboy James Hunt, and we had the opportunity to discuss the role with her.

The film – which depicts the intense rivalry between Formula 1 racers Niki Lauda and James Rush – sees Wilde trying out her English accent, and we discussed that with the actress. She also tells which of the two conflicting personalities between the racers she’d be more attracted to, whether she has ever met the real life Suzy Miller – and discusses her working relationship with fiancé Jason Sudeikis.

How did you get involved in Rush?
When I heard Ron was making the film, I went to meet with him at his office in LA. We knew each other a bit from Cowboys & Aliens, which he produced. I thought the film sounded incredible. I didn’t know of the actual people – I didn’t know of James or Nikki – but I know that the story just sounded like and emotional, beautiful love story, He described the role of Suzy to me and I thought that she sounded incredible. I mean, here was James Hunt’s match, and that’s what we wanted to create. So once I was on board we just worked on that – on making her the most formidable opponent for James other than Nikki. Ron was just a wonderful director of course and wanted so much so much to put energy and focus into the female characters as well, which is not typical – I think other directors would have taken on this same project and just focused on the boys and on the racing. But Peter [Morgan] and Ron really cared a lot about making it clear that these guys were going through a lot in their personal lives as they were fighting each other.

Good work on the British accent, by the way…
Oh god, thank-you! My dad’s British, so I had no excuse not to at least give it a good try.

Can you still do it?
I won’t do it right now! [Laughs] Chris was also, of course, doing an accent, so we had a dialect coach. I think because we were both working on it and focussing on it that we kind of inspired each other to do a better job at it, you know. It was just so fun to inhabit this world – like not only to be British, but to be British in the 70s, and these particular people. It was just a lot of fun – it didn’t feel like work, it felt like just a lot of fun.

Read the full article »

filed in Interviews
posted by Jennifer • September 12th, 2013 • Comments Off on Olivia Wilde On “Allure” Magazine

Olivia Wilde is featured on the cover of the October 2013 issue of “Allure” magazine! Check out her cover below…

Olivia Wilde - Allure
filed in Alerts, Magazines
posted by Jennifer • September 12th, 2013 • Comments Off on TIFF 2013: Olivia Wilde on Rush and Third Person

Olivia Wilde had two movies at the Toronto International Film Festival. In the true story Rush, she plays Suzy Miller, a model who briefly marries F1 racer James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and moves on to Richard Burton. Hunt was the rival of Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl) and the film chronicles their 1976 racing season. Third Person was screening the day after my interview with Wilde, and I couldn’t even get a ticket this week. It is an ensemble drama written and directed by Paul Haggis.

CraveOnline: Obviously they can never fit everything in the film. Did you shoot any more scenes as Suzy that got cut?

Olivia Wilde: No. No, Suzy was never a big role. The story’s always been about Hunt and Lauda. Actually, Suzy got an extra scene because there was originally a scene between Burton and Hunt. That last scene of me in the restaurant with James was originally a scene with James and Richard Burton where Burton’s explaining that he’s marrying Suzy and that he wants to pay well for her to settle the divorce. In reality he paid about a million pounds. That was a lot in ’76. That scene ended up being my scene so I actually got a little bonus which was fun.
 

So you really only have three scenes to portray the entire arc of this relationship. What was the exercise of that for you?

Well, I knew that the purpose of including Suzy in this story was to show a different side of James, to show the kind of tumult of his personal life, that he had demons and that he self-medicated and it made him nearly impossible to live with. Behind this kind of smiling charming golden boy public persona, he was quite a tortured person. Also, before that point, that he was actually quite a charming and romantic person who proposed to a woman he had just met, doing something completely spontaneous and wild and she was totally charmed by that as well. I also wanted to make sure that we portrayed their love story as a love story, that you got a sense that there was something real there. She wasn’t just another one of his conquests, nor was she a kind of long-suffering victim. She was very much in love with him.
 

Normally the breakup happens in the third act of a biographical story. This really changed things up, because they’re divorced before the halfway mark.

I really love the way Peter Morgan structured the script. So complex, and the editor did a brilliant job, I thought as well, of making it all clear. But really, if it’s a love story, it’s between Hunt and Lauda. The structure of it if you think of them as the love story works perfectly. They come back together in that final scene by the airplane which is one of my favorite scenes. My other favorite scene is when the Italians pick them up by the side of the road. Those two Italian guys and they’re like, “Lauda! Niki Lauda!” That scene’s brilliant but the end, the scene by the airplane, I just think it’s so moving. Peter Morgan says he wrote the whole movie for that scene and I love it because you get the sense that Lauda’s begging Hunt to stay in it, to stay his competitor because he is who is driving him to greatness. Without Hunt, can Niki push himself that hard? I thought that was great.
 

Do we know that Suzy kept watching the races?

Yes, she did.
 

So that’s not artistic license.

No, she did. She watched him for years and she’s still very fond of him, remembers him fondly and lovingly. She believes that they were in love and it just couldn’t work. I actually think it’s a very evolved, loving line when she says to him, “You’re not terrible. You’re just who you are at this moment in your life.” Most women, when a relationship doesn’t work, or most people I think find it hard to be that understanding. I think it’s quite loving of her to not say, “Yeah, you’re an asshole. You fucked up, you were a terrible husband.” She’s like, “No, it’s just who you are. It’s who you are right now and I have enough self-respect not to deal with it.”
 

When you see the role of Suzy in the story was to show that side of James, how much research do you do on the real Suzy?

As much as I could. There isn’t a huge amount available, so I read everything I could, I watched anything I could. I looked at all her photos trying to understand her. I learned a lot from the biographies on James Hunt because I thought, “What kind of woman would fall in love with him? What does that take? What kind of spirit was she?” And she’s still, although I think in her young, wild days she was just an amazingly spontaneous wild woman and now is more mature of course and only remembers the good things about James, when at the time I think he could be a nightmare. He could be a total nightmare.
 

The movie might bring back some memories.

Yeah, yeah, we’ll see.

CraveOnline: You’ve gotten a lot of great roles in film and television, in comedy and drama, but this summer was Drinking Buddies a really monumental role for you?

Olivia Wilde: Yes, game changer. That one was a passion project of mine and I think one of the reasons that people responded well to it is because we made it for the right reasons. We made it not for the result. We made it for the process. It was an exercise in telling a story honestly. I was so proud of it from beginning to end. It was a movie we made for no money, just in Chicago, literally working in a brewery with people working around us, borrowing people’s offices so we could shoot for an hour and then let them back in, and it was just a wonderful experience and I learned a lot from it. So to see it being embraced has been really great and I think it emboldens my drive to do more films like it.
 

How is it going to change the way you approach characters moving forward?

Well, aside from I doubt I’ll be able to improvise every movie from now on, but I think if you took that process of Drinking Buddies which really helped me understand a character very, very well because I had to be so aware of who she was. I had to be ready for any situation, any conversation at any point so I had to know her in such a deep way so that if another actor decided to bring up a question in a scene, “Where did you go to college? What do you like to eat? What’s your dream in life?” I’d be able to answer those questions. That should be a part of every process for every character. That should be part of the preparation. So if I take every script from now on and imagine having to put the entire thing into my own words and to really understand that person in a very deep way, I think it would serve me in a positive way.
 

Have you found that even people who never watched “House” know who 13 is?

That’s funny. I always assumed if they knew 13 then they watched the show, but maybe you’re right.
 

I think there were people who wanted to know who you were and they learned about number 13.

That’s hilarious. Well, I do hear it quite often and it makes me laugh because I remember the day I was in the writers room in “House” and David Shore, our head writer, said, because it was a nickname that House had come up with for me because I had a racing bib on that said 13. Shore said, “I think your name will be 13.” And I said, “Really? That’s ambitious. Won’t people find it confusing or odd?” He said, “No, it’s a name that is memorable and it will become a symbol of the show. You’ll see, it’ll stick.” So when people yell, “13!” I always think of David Shore saying that. I’m like, “You were right, man.”
 

Third Person hasn’t shown yet, so what kind of character did you get to play in that?

That’s a really exciting film. I play a young writer who is having an affair with Liam Neeson’s character who is also a writer, a quite well known novelist. She’s an icier character than I’ve played. She’s complex. She’s kind of damaged. She’s very smart and very mercurial and we learn a lot of tragic things about her but I spend most of the movie in a conversation with Liam. It’s fascinating because he’s so good and so subtle that when I watched the film I saw even more dimensions than I saw in person. He’s really, really good in this role. I call him the big friendly giant but he also carries this weight of a survivor on him that I think he’s probably had since he was a kid. I bet he was one of those little kids with grown-up eyes. So I’m really excited for people to see that. It’s a really intricate film. It’s three simultaneous stories and great actors. I think it’s Paul Haggis’ best thing in a while.
 

Did that come as an offer with your history with Paul?

I originally worked with him on a show called “The Black Donnellys” so we became good friends and then we started an organization together in Haiti with a couple people in the entertainment world called Artists for Peace and Justice. Paul and I have known each other a long time and this was an intimate experience, working on really difficult material with the writer who’s also the screenwriter. I was very honored to get this role. It was one of those roles you get and you’re like, “Whew, okay, this is the big leagues. This is varsity.”
 

What can we expect from Better Living Through Chemistry?

That’s a funny film. I play a pill popping drunk miserable trophy wife who convinces Sam Rockwell to kill my husband. I love Sam Rockwell so in that instance it was just getting to play with one of the most amazing actors of my generation, just so interesting and funny. That’s a great film. I can’t wait for people to see that.
 

Do you hear anything from Team Tron?

Occasionally it bubbles up and I hear things, little whispers of sequels. I told them at this point I don’t know who I would play because I can’t fit into that suit, so I told them I’ll play the mom.
 

Do you think you wouldn’t continue that story with Quorra in the real world?

Oh no, in seriousness, yes. I’d be into it. I liked Quorra a lot. I helped create that character from such an early stage that she felt very much my own and I was very proud of her. The film went through this kind of corporatization process. It’s a difficult story to tell and difficult to know what audience it’s for, but I would have a lot of fun being Quorra again. The last couple times we’ve talked, I said I would do it if they asked. We’ll see. We’ll see. Maybe they’ll take their time with it.
 

You can wear real clothes this time.

That’d be nice. I said they can make the suit out of sweatpants. 

craveonline.com

filed in Films, Interviews
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